Concept

Blastocyst

Summary
The blastocyst is a structure formed in the early embryonic development of mammals. It possesses an inner cell mass (ICM) also known as the embryoblast which subsequently forms the embryo, and an outer layer of trophoblast cells called the trophectoderm. This layer surrounds the inner cell mass and a fluid-filled cavity known as the blastocoel. In the late blastocyst the trophectoderm is known as the trophoblast. The trophoblast gives rise to the chorion and amnion, the two fetal membranes that surround the embryo. The placenta derives from the embryonic chorion (the portion of the chorion that develops villi) and the underlying uterine tissue of the mother. The name "blastocyst" arises from the Greek βλαστός blastós ("a sprout") and κύστις kýstis ("bladder, capsule"). In non-mammalian animals this is a structure consisting of an undifferentiated ball of cells and is called a blastula. In humans, blastocyst formation begins about five days after fertilization
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