Concept

Act of God

Summary
In legal usage in the English-speaking world, an act of God or damnum fatale ("loss arising from inevitable accident") is a natural hazard outside human control, such as an earthquake or tsunami, for which no person can be held responsible. An act of God may amount to an exception to liability in contracts (as under the Hague–Visby Rules) or it may be an "insured peril" in an insurance policy. In Scots law the equivalent term is damnum fatale, while most Common law proper legal systems uses the term act of God. By contrast, other extraordinary man-made or political events are deemed force majeure. Contract law In the law of contracts, an act of God may be interpreted as an implied defense under the rule of impossibility or impracticability. If so, the promise is discharged because of unforeseen occurrences, which were unavoidable and would result in insurmountable delay, expense, or other material breach. Under the English common law, contractual obligations were deeme
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