Concept

Curvilinear perspective

Summary
Curvilinear perspective, also five-point perspective, is a graphical projection used to draw 3D objects on 2D surfaces. It was formally codified in 1968 by the artists and art historians André Barre and Albert Flocon in the book La Perspective curviligne, which was translated into English in 1987 as Curvilinear Perspective: From Visual Space to the Constructed Image and published by the University of California Press. Curvilinear perspective is sometimes colloquially called fisheye perspective, by analogy to a fisheye lens. In computer animation and motion graphics, it may also be called tiny planet. History An early example of approximated five-point curvilinear perspective is within the Arnolfini Portrait (1434) by the Flemish Primitive Jan van Eyck. Later examples may be found in mannerist painter Parmigianino Self-portrait in a Convex Mirror (c. 1524) and A View of Delft (1652) by the Dutch Golden Age painter Carel Fabritius. In 1959, Flocon had acquired a copy of G
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading