Concept

Inversion transformation

Summary
In mathematical physics, inversion transformations are a natural extension of Poincaré transformations to include all conformal, one-to-one transformations on coordinate space-time. They are less studied in physics because, unlike the rotations and translations of Poincaré symmetry, an object cannot be physically transformed by the inversion symmetry. Some physical theories are invariant under this symmetry, in these cases it is what is known as a 'hidden symmetry'. Other hidden symmetries of physics include gauge symmetry and general covariance. Early use In 1831 the mathematician Ludwig Immanuel Magnus began to publish on transformations of the plane generated by inversion in a circle of radius R. His work initiated a large body of publications, now called inversive geometry. The most prominently named mathematician became August Ferdinand Möbius once he reduced the planar transformations to complex number arithmetic. In the company of physicists employing the inversion t
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