Concept

Murus gallicus

Summary
Murus gallicus or Gallic wall is a method of construction of defensive walls used to protect Iron Age hillforts and oppida of the La Tene period in Western Europe. Basic features The distinctive features are:
  • earth or rubble fill
  • transverse cross beams at approximately 2 ft (60 cm) intervals
  • longitudinal timbers laid on the cross beams and attached with mortice joints, nails, or iron spikes through augered holes
  • outer stone facing
  • cross beams protruding through the stone facing
Technique and utility The technique of construction and the utility of the walls was described by Julius Caesar in his Commentaries on the Gallic War: But this is usually the form of all the Gallic walls. Straight beams, connected lengthwise and two feet distant from each other at equal intervals, are placed together on the ground; these are morticed on the inside, and covered with plenty of earth. But the intervals which we have mentioned, are closed up in front
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