Concept

Sequentially compact space

Summary
In mathematics, a topological space X is sequentially compact if every sequence of points in X has a convergent subsequence converging to a point in X. Every metric space is naturally a topological space, and for metric spaces, the notions of compactness and sequential compactness are equivalent (if one assumes countable choice). However, there exist sequentially compact topological spaces that are not compact, and compact topological spaces that are not sequentially compact. Examples and properties The space of all real numbers with the standard topology is not sequentially compact; the sequence (s_n) given by s_n = n for all natural numbers n is a sequence that has no convergent subsequence. If a space is a metric space, then it is sequentially compact if and only if it is compact. The first uncountable ordinal with the order topology is an example of a sequentially compact topological space that is not compact. The
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