Concept

Nothing comes from nothing

Summary
Nothing comes from nothing (οὐδὲν ἐξ οὐδενός; ex nihilo nihil fit) is a philosophical dictum first argued by Parmenides. It is associated with ancient Greek cosmology, such as is presented not just in the works of Homer and Hesiod, but also in virtually every internal system: there is no break in-between a world that did not exist and one that did, since it could not be created ex nihilo in the first place. Parmenides The idea that "nothing comes from nothing", as articulated by Parmenides, first appears in Aristotle's Physics: τί δ᾽ ἄν μιν καὶ χρέος ὦρσεν ὕστερον ἢ πρόσθεν, τοῦ μηδενὸς ἀρξάμενον, φῦν; οὕτως ἢ πάμπαν πελέναι χρεών ἐστιν ἢ οὐχί. The above, in a translation based on the John Burnet translation, appears as follows: Yet why would it be created later rather than sooner, if it came from nothing; so, it must either be created altogether or not [created at all]. Lucretius The Roman poet and philosopher Lucretius expressed this principle in his first bo
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