Concept

Xavante

Summary
The Xavante (also Shavante, Chavante, Akuen, A'uwe, Akwe, Awen, or Akwen) are an indigenous people, comprising about 30,000 individuals within the territory of eastern Mato Grosso state in Brazil. They speak the Xavante language, part of the Jê language family. History They were enslaved in the 18th century, after which they have tried to avoid contact. A temporary coexistence with westernized society in the 19th century in the state of Goiás, was followed by withdrawal to Mato Grosso (between 1830 and 1860). They were "re-discovered" during the 1930s. From 1946 to 1957, they were brought under Getúlio Vargas’ National Integration Program, but still experienced massacres and disease. Due to this history, they have a distrust of non-Xavante people. Today they are still wary of any approach of non-Xavante, called "waradzu". The Xavante leader Mário Juruna was the first indigenous Brazilian to become a federal representative. The Xavante, like
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