Concept

Erwin Schrödinger

Summary
Erwin Rudolf Josef Alexander Schrödinger (UKˈʃrɜːdɪŋər, USˈʃroʊ-; ˈɛɐ̯vɪn ˈʃʁøːdɪŋɐ; 12 August 1887 – 4 January 1961), sometimes written as or , was a Nobel Prize-winning Austrian and naturalized Irish physicist who developed fundamental results in quantum theory. In particular, he is recognized for postulating the Schrödinger equation, an equation that provides a way to calculate the wave function of a system and how it changes dynamically in time. In addition, he wrote many works on various aspects of physics: statistical mechanics and thermodynamics, physics of dielectrics, colour theory, electrodynamics, general relativity, and cosmology, and he made several attempts to construct a unified field theory. In his book What Is Life? Schrödinger addressed the problems of genetics, looking at the phenomenon of life from the point of view of physics. He also paid great attention to the philosophical aspects of science, ancient, and oriental philosophical concepts, ethics, and religion.
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