Concept

The pen is mightier than the sword

Résumé
"The pen is mightier than the sword" is a metonymic adage, indicating that the written word is more effective than violence as a means of social or political change. This sentiment has been expressed with metaphorical contrasts of writing implements and weapons for thousands of years. The specific wording that "the pen is mightier than the sword" was first used by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839. Under some interpretations, written communication can refer to administrative power or an independent news media. Origin The exact sentence was coined by English author Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839 for his play Richelieu; Or the Conspiracy. The play was about Cardinal Richelieu, though in the author's words "license with dates and details ... has been, though not unsparingly, indulged". The Cardinal's line in Act II, scene II, was more fully: True,—This! Beneath the rule of men entirely great The pen is mightier than the sword
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