Concept

Knees Up Mother Brown

Résumé
"Knees Up Mother Brown" is a pub song, believed to date back as early as the 1800s, but first published in 1938, and with origins in the East End of London. With its origins in public houses of East London, it was associated with Cockney culture. At the end of the First World War, it is documented to have been sung widely in London on 11 November 1918 (Armistice Night). The 1938 version was attributed to Bert Lee, Harris Weston and I. Taylor. During the Second World War it was performed frequently by Elsie and Doris Waters. It was also later performed on television by Noel Harrison and Petula Clark. The expression "knees up" means to have a 'party' or 'a dance' - usually accompanied by drinking. Lyrics The most familiar version of the song is: :Knees up Mother Brown :Knees up Mother Brown :Under the table you must go :Ee-aye, Ee-aye, Ee-aye-oh :If I catch you bending :I'll saw your legs right off :Knees up, knees up :don't get the breeze up :Knees up Mother Brown Other l
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