Concept

Waverley (novel)

Summary
Waverley; or, ’Tis Sixty Years Since ˈweɪvərli is a historical novel by Walter Scott (1771–1832). Scott was already famous as a poet, and chose to publish it anonymously in 1814 as his first venture into prose fiction. It is often regarded as one of the first historical novels in the Western tradition. Edward Waverley, an English gentleman of honour, chooses an occupation in the army at the time just before the Jacobite uprising of 1745 on advice of his father. He has an officer's commission. On leave from army training, he visits friends of his family in Scotland, as he is not far from their place. He enjoys their Scottish hospitality. His head is full of the romantic notions of his unstructured education, including much reading, and he is startled to find himself in the midst of loyalists who support the return of the House of Stuart and the Stuart prince, known as Bonnie Prince Charlie and the Young Chevalier to his supporters and as the Younger Pretender to his foes. His honour is
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