Summary
A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English) or neighborhood (American English; see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area, sometimes consisting of a single street and the buildings lining it. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members. Researchers have not agreed on an exact definition, but the following may serve as a starting point: "Neighbourhood is generally defined spatially as a specific geographic area and functionally as a set of social networks. Neighbourhoods, then, are the spatial units in which face-to-face social interactions occur—the personal settings and situations where residents seek to realise common values, socialise youth, and maintain effective social control." In the words of the urban scholar Lewis Mumford, "Neighbourhoods, in some annoying, inchoate fashion exist wherever human beings congregate, in permanent family dwellings; and many of the functions of the city tend to be distributed naturally—that is, without any theoretical preoccupation or political direction—into neighbourhoods." Most of the earliest cities around the world as excavated by archaeologists have evidence for the presence of social neighbourhoods. Historical documents shed light on neighbourhood life in numerous historical preindustrial or nonwestern cities. Neighbourhoods are typically generated by social interaction among people living near one another. In this sense they are local social units larger than households not directly under the control of city or state officials. In some preindustrial urban traditions, basic municipal functions such as protection, social regulation of births and marriages, cleaning and upkeep are handled informally by neighbourhoods and not by urban governments; this pattern is well documented for historical Islamic cities. In addition to social neighbourhoods, most ancient and historical cities also had administrative districts used by officials for taxation, record-keeping, and social control.
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications (12)

Property rights redistribution and the spatial evolution of the Chinese danwei compound: a case study in Beijing

Mengke Zhang, Teng Zhang

Danwei compounds were the dominant form of urban neighborhood in China's planned economy era. However, since the economic reform, the status of danwei compounds has undergone dramatic changes. By exam
SPRINGER2021

Conduit, Patio, Waste: Mapping Environmental Relations in Bairro da Malagueira

Bárbara Maçães E Costa

The ongoing ecological crisis is reframing the common binary opposition between architecture and nature and provoking us to ask what kinds of buildings we collectively want to create for the ecosystem
EPFL2021

Retrofitting, district heating and energy storage: neighborhood energy planning

Jérôme Henri Kämpf, Jakob Moritz Fabian Rager, Fabien Luc Poumadère, Diane Von Gunten

We compare simulated energy retrofitting of individual buildings with energy refurbishments optimized at the scale of the neighborhood. For the neighborhood case, buildings can also be connected toget
IOP Publishing Ltd2019
Show more
Related units

No results

Related concepts (9)
Rural area
In general, a rural area or a countryside is a geographic area that is located outside towns and cities. Typical rural areas have a low population density and small settlements. Agricultural areas and areas with forestry typically are described as rural. Different countries have varying definitions of rural for statistical and administrative purposes.
Neighbourhood
A neighbourhood (Commonwealth English) or neighborhood (American English; see spelling differences) is a geographically localised community within a larger city, town, suburb or rural area, sometimes consisting of a single street and the buildings lining it. Neighbourhoods are often social communities with considerable face-to-face interaction among members. Researchers have not agreed on an exact definition, but the following may serve as a starting point: "Neighbourhood is generally defined spatially as a specific geographic area and functionally as a set of social networks.
Town
A town is a human settlement where people live. It refers to the totality of human community with all the social, material, organizational, spiritual, and cultural elements that sustain it. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. The word "town" shares an origin with the German word Zaun, the Dutch word tuin, and the Old Norse tún.
Show more
Related courses (5)
AR-616: EDAR thesis writing workshop
The workshop will equip participants with practical skills necessary to make thesis writing smoother and better organized. Main issues covered are: getting started, structure and argumentation, time m
MATH-106(f): Analysis II
Étudier les concepts fondamentaux d'analyse et le calcul différentiel et intégral des fonctions réelles de plusieurs variables.
MATH-101(en): Analysis I (English)
We study the fundamental concepts of analysis, calculus and the integral of real-valued functions of a real variable.
Show more
Related lectures (28)
Limites en un point: définition et exemples
Covers the definition and examples of limits at a point in calculus.
Limits at Infinity: Algebra and Continuity
Covers limits at infinity, algebra, and continuity with examples.
Loopholes in Urban Walking
Explores the daily life and interactions of a 72-year-old man in a new neighborhood, emphasizing community and urban design.
Show more
Related MOOCs

No results