Concept

Admittance

Summary
In electrical engineering, admittance is a measure of how easily a circuit or device will allow a current to flow. It is defined as the reciprocal of impedance, analogous to how conductance and resistance are defined. The SI unit of admittance is the siemens (symbol S); the older, synonymous unit is mho, and its symbol is ℧ (an upside-down uppercase omega Ω). Oliver Heaviside coined the term admittance in December 1887. Heaviside used Y to represent the magnitude of admittance, but it quickly became the conventional symbol for admittance itself through the publications of Charles Proteus Steinmetz. Heaviside probably chose Y simply because it is next to Z in the alphabet, the conventional symbol for impedance. Admittance is defined as :Y \equiv \frac{1}{Z} , where :Y is the admittance, measured in siemens :Z is the impedance, measured in ohms Resistance is a measure of the opposition of a circuit to the flow of a steady current, while impedance takes into account not
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