Concept

Single-lens reflex camera

Summary
A single-lens reflex camera (SLR) is a camera that typically uses a mirror and prism system (hence "reflex" from the mirror's reflection) that permits the photographer to view through the lens and see exactly what will be captured. With twin lens reflex and rangefinder cameras, the viewed image could be significantly different from the final image. When the shutter button is pressed on most SLRs, the mirror flips out of the light path, allowing light to pass through to the light receptor and the image to be captured. History History of the single-lens reflex camera File:Hasselblad 1600F.jpg|[[Medium format]] SLR by [[Hasselblad]] (Model 1600F), Sweden File:Zenza BRONICA S2 with ZENZANON 100mm F2.8.JPG|Medium format SLR by [[Bronica]] (Model S2), Japan. Bronica's later model—the Bronica EC—was the first medium format SLR camera to use an electrically operated [[focal-plane shutter]] File:Asahiflex600.jpg|The 1952 ([[Pentax]]) [[Asahiflex]], Japan's first single-lens ref
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