Concept

Golden angle

Summary
In geometry, the golden angle is the smaller of the two angles created by sectioning the circumference of a circle according to the golden ratio; that is, into two arcs such that the ratio of the length of the smaller arc to the length of the larger arc is the same as the ratio of the length of the larger arc to the full circumference of the circle. Algebraically, let a+b be the circumference of a circle, divided into a longer arc of length a and a smaller arc of length b such that : \frac{a + b}{a} = \frac{a}{b} The golden angle is then the angle subtended by the smaller arc of length b. It measures approximately 137.5077640500378546463487 ...° or in radians 2.39996322972865332 ... . The name comes from the golden angle's connection to the golden ratio φ; the exact value of the golden angle is : 360\left(1 - \frac{1}{\varphi}\right) = 360(2 - \varphi) = \frac{360}{\varphi^2} = 180(3 - \sqrt{5})\text{ degrees} or : 2\pi \left( 1 - \fra
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications

Loading

Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading