Concept

Humanistic psychology

Summary
Humanistic psychology is a psychological perspective that arose in the mid-20th century in answer to two theories: Sigmund Freud's psychoanalytic theory and B. F. Skinner's behaviorism. Thus, Abraham Maslow established the need for a "third force" in psychology. The school of thought of humanistic psychology gained traction due to key figure Abraham Maslow in the 1950s during the time of the humanistic movement. It was made popular in the 1950s by the process of realizing and expressing one's own capabilities and creativity. Some elements of humanistic psychology are
  • to understand people, ourselves and others, as a whole greater than the sum of their parts.
  • to acknowledge the relevance and significance of the full life history of an individual.
  • to acknowledge the importance of intentionality in human existence.
  • to recognize the importance of an end goal of life for a healthy person.
Humanistic psychology also acknowledges spiritual aspiration as an integral
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