Concept

Combination

Summary
In mathematics, a combination is a selection of items from a set that has distinct members, such that the order of selection does not matter (unlike permutations). For example, given three fruits, say an apple, an orange and a pear, there are three combinations of two that can be drawn from this set: an apple and a pear; an apple and an orange; or a pear and an orange. More formally, a k-combination of a set S is a subset of k distinct elements of S. So, two combinations are identical if and only if each combination has the same members. (The arrangement of the members in each set does not matter.) If the set has n elements, the number of k-combinations, denoted by C(n,k) or C^n_k, is equal to the binomial coefficient \binom nk = \frac{n(n-1)\dotsb(n-k+1)}{k(k-1)\dotsb1}, which can be written using factorials as \textstyle\frac{n!}{k!(n-k)!} whenever k\leq n, and which is zero when k>n. Th
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