Concept

Vanishing point

Summary
A vanishing point is a point on the image plane of a perspective rendering where the two-dimensional perspective projections of mutually parallel lines in three-dimensional space appear to converge. When the set of parallel lines is perpendicular to a picture plane, the construction is known as one-point perspective, and their vanishing point corresponds to the oculus, or "eye point", from which the image should be viewed for correct perspective geometry. Traditional linear drawings use objects with one to three sets of parallels, defining one to three vanishing points. Italian humanist polymath and architect Leon Battista Alberti first introduced the concept in his treatise on perspective in art, De pictura, written in 1435. Vector notation The vanishing point may also be referred to as the "direction point", as lines having the same directional vector, say D, will have the same vanishing point. Mathematically, let q ≡ (x, y, f) be a point lying on the image plane, whe
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