Concept

Compton scattering

Summary
Compton scattering (also called the Compton effect) discovered by Arthur Holly Compton, is the scattering of a high frequency photon after an interaction with a charged particle, usually an electron. It results in a decrease in energy (increase in wavelength) of the photon (which may be an X-ray or gamma ray photon), called the Compton effect. Part of the energy of the photon is transferred to the recoiling particle. Inverse Compton scattering has the opposite effect, occurring when a high-energy charged particle transfers part of its energy to a photon, resulting in an increase in energy (decrease in wavelength) of the photon. Introduction Compton scattering is commonly described as inelastic scattering, because the energy in the scattered photon is less than the energy of the incident photon. Energy of the incident photon is transferred to the electron (recoil) but only as kinetic energy in the laboratory frame. The electron gains no internal energy, respective masses r
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