Concept

Brush discharge

Summary
A brush discharge is an electrical disruptive discharge similar to a corona discharge that takes place at an electrode with a high voltage applied to it, embedded in a nonconducting fluid, usually air. It is characterized by multiple luminous writhing sparks, plasma streamers composed of ionized air molecules, which repeatedly strike out from the electrode into the air, often with a crackling sound. The streamers spread out in a fan shape, giving it the appearance of a "brush". Corona and brush discharges are sometimes called one-electrode discharges because they occur in the vicinity of a single electrode, and don't extend as far as the electrode carrying opposite polarity voltage in the circuit, as an electric arc (a two-electrode discharge) does. *Corona discharge — occurs at sharp points and edges (radius < 1 mm). It is a uniform ionization (glow discharge) visible as a dim stationary blue glow, fading out as it extends from the conductor. *Brush discharge — occurs at
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