Concept

Annulation

Summary
In organic chemistry annulation (from the Latin anellus for "little ring"; occasionally annelation) is a chemical reaction in which a new ring is constructed on a molecule. : Examples are the Robinson annulation, Danheiser annulation and certain cycloadditions. Annular molecules are constructed from side-on condensed cyclic segments, for example helicenes and acenes. In transannulation a bicyclic molecule is created by intramolecular carbon-carbon bond formation in a large monocyclic ring. An example is the samarium(II) iodide induced ketone - alkene cyclization of 5-methylenecyclooctanone which proceeds through a ketyl intermediate: : Benzannulation The term benzannulated compounds refers to derivatives of cyclic compounds (usually aromatic) which are fused to a benzene ring. Examples are listed in the table below: In contemporary chemical literature, the term benzannulation also means "construction of benzene rings from acyclic precursors". Transannular interact
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