Concept

Caenorhabditis briggsae

Summary
Caenorhabditis briggsae is a small nematode, closely related to Caenorhabditis elegans. The differences between the two species are subtle. The male tail in C. briggsae has a slightly different morphology from C. elegans. Other differences include changes in vulval precursor competence and the placement of the excretory duct opening. C. briggsae is frequently used to study the differences between it and the more intimately understood C. elegans, especially at the DNA and protein sequence level. Several mutant strains of C. briggsae have also been isolated that facilitate genetic analysis of this organism. C. briggsae, like C. elegans, is a hermaphrodite. The genome sequence for C. briggsae was determined in 2003. History C. briggsae was initially discovered by Margaret Briggs in 1944. The first individuals were isolated from a pile of leaves found on the Palo Alto campus of Stanford University. Briggs, who was studying for her MS, identified the nematodes as an unknown spec
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