Concept

Broadcast storm

Summary
A broadcast storm or broadcast radiation is the accumulation of broadcast and multicast traffic on a computer network. Extreme amounts of broadcast traffic constitute a broadcast storm. It can consume sufficient network resources so as to render the network unable to transport normal traffic. A packet that induces such a storm is occasionally nicknamed a Chernobyl packet. Causes Most commonly the cause is a switching loop in the Ethernet network topology (i.e. two or more paths exist between switches). A simple example is both ends of a single Ethernet patch cable connected to a switch. As broadcasts and multicasts are forwarded by switches out of every port, the switch or switches will repeatedly rebroadcast broadcast messages and flood the network. Since the layer-2 header does not support a time to live (TTL) value, if a frame is sent into a looped topology, it can loop forever. In some cases, a broadcast storm can be instigated for the purpose of a denial of service (
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