Concept

Syncword

Summary
In computer networks, a syncword, sync character, sync sequence or preamble is used to synchronize a data transmission by indicating the end of header information and the start of data. The syncword is a known sequence of data used to identify the start of a frame, and is also called reference signal or midamble in wireless communications. Prefix codes allow unambiguous identification of synchronization sequences and may serve as self-synchronizing code. Examples In an audio receiver receiving a bit stream of data, an example of a syncword is 0x0B77 for an AC-3 encoded stream. An Ethernet packet with the Ethernet preamble, 56 bits of alternating 1 and 0 bits, allowing the receiver to synchronize its clock to the transmitter, followed by a one-octet start frame delimiter byte and then the header. All USB packets begin with a sync field (8 bits long at low speed, 32 bits long at high speed) used to synchronize the receiver's clock to the transmitter's clock. A receiver
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