Concept

Pace Egg play

Résumé
The Pace Egg plays are an Easter custom in rural Northern England in the tradition of the medieval mystery plays. The practice was once common throughout Northern England, but largely died out in the nineteenth century before being revived in some areas of Lancashire and West Yorkshire in the twentieth century. The plays, which involved mock combat, were performed by Pace Eggers, who sometimes received gifts of decorated eggs from villagers. Several closely related folk songs were associated with Pace Egging. Etymology The Oxford English Dictionary gives the forms pace egg (first attested in 1579), paste egg (first attested in 1611), pasch egg (first attested in 1677), and paschal egg (first attested in 1844). The first word of the first three of these names (which on its own is usually spelled pasch) seems to come into English partly from Anglo-Norman pasche (attested to mean both 'Easter' and 'Passover'), whose standard modern French equivalents are pâques 'Easter' and pa
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