Concept

Strange quark

Summary
The strange quark or s quark (from its symbol, s) is the third lightest of all quarks, a type of elementary particle. Strange quarks are found in subatomic particles called hadrons. Examples of hadrons containing strange quarks include kaons (Kaon), strange D mesons (Strange D), Sigma baryons (Sigma), and other strange particles. According to the IUPAP, the symbol s is the official name, while "strange" is to be considered only as a mnemonic. The name sideways has also been used because the s quark has an I3 value of 0 while the u ("up") and d ("down") quarks have values of +1/2 and −1/2 respectively. Along with the charm quark, it is part of the second generation of matter. It has an electric charge of −1/3 e and a bare mass of 95MeV/c2. Like all quarks, the strange quark is an elementary fermion with spin 1/2, and experiences all four fundamental interactions:
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