Concept

Index of coincidence

Summary
In cryptography, coincidence counting is the technique (invented by William F. Friedman) of putting two texts side-by-side and counting the number of times that identical letters appear in the same position in both texts. This count, either as a ratio of the total or normalized by dividing by the expected count for a random source model, is known as the index of coincidence, or IC for short. Because letters in a natural language are not distributed evenly, the IC is higher for such texts than it would be for uniformly random text strings. What makes the IC especially useful is the fact that its value does not change if both texts are scrambled by the same single-alphabet substitution cipher, allowing a cryptanalyst to quickly detect that form of encryption. Calculation The index of coincidence provides a measure of how likely it is to draw two matching letters by randomly selecting two letters from a given text. The chance of drawing a given letter in the text is (number o
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