Concept

Nail (fastener)

Summary
In woodworking and construction, a nail is a small object made of metal (or wood, called a tree nail or "trunnel") which is used as a fastener, as a peg to hang something, or sometimes as a decoration. Generally, nails have a sharp point on one end and a flattened head on the other, but headless nails are available. Nails are made in a great variety of forms for specialized purposes. The most common is a wire nail. Other types of nails include pins, tacks, brads, spikes, and cleats. Nails are typically driven into the workpiece by a hammer or nail gun. A nail holds materials together by friction in the axial direction and shear strength laterally. The point of the nail is also sometimes bent over or clinched after driving to prevent pulling out. History The history of the nail is divided roughly into three distinct periods:
  • Hand-wrought (forged) nail (pre-history until 19th century)
  • Cut nail (roughly 1800 to 1914)
  • Wire nail (roughly 1860 to the present) From the
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