Concept

Pion

Summary
In particle physics, a pion (or a pi meson, denoted with the Greek letter pi: Pion) is any of three subatomic particles: Pion0, Pion+, and Pion-. Each pion consists of a quark and an antiquark and is therefore a meson. Pions are the lightest mesons and, more generally, the lightest hadrons. They are unstable, with the charged pions Pion+ and Pion- decaying after a mean lifetime of 26.033 nanoseconds (2.6033e-8 seconds), and the neutral pion Pion0 decaying after a much shorter lifetime of 85 attoseconds (8.5e-17 seconds). Charged pions most often decay into muons and muon neutrinos, while neutral pions generally decay into gamma rays. The exchange of virtual pions, along with vector, rho and omega mesons, provides an explanation for the residual strong force between nucleons. Pions are not produced in radioactive decay, but commonly are in high-energy collisions between
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