Concept

Grid cell

Summary
A grid cell is a type of neuron within the entorhinal cortex that fires at regular intervals as an animal navigates an open area, allowing it to understand its position in space by storing and integrating information about location, distance, and direction. Grid cells have been found in many animals, including rats, mice, bats, monkeys, and humans. Grid cells were discovered in 2005 by Edvard Moser, May-Britt Moser, and their students Torkel Hafting, Marianne Fyhn, and Sturla Molden at the Centre for the Biology of Memory (CBM) in Norway. They were awarded the 2014 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine together with John O'Keefe for their discoveries of cells that constitute a positioning system in the brain. The arrangement of spatial firing fields, all at equal distances from their neighbors, led to a hypothesis that these cells encode a neural representation of Euclidean space. The discovery also suggested a mechanism for dynamic comp
About this result
This page is automatically generated and may contain information that is not correct, complete, up-to-date, or relevant to your search query. The same applies to every other page on this website. Please make sure to verify the information with EPFL's official sources.
Related publications (9)

Loading

Loading

Loading

Show more
Related people

Loading

Related units

Loading

Related concepts

Loading

Related courses

Loading

Related lectures

Loading