Concept

Triangle inequality

Summary
In mathematics, the triangle inequality states that for any triangle, the sum of the lengths of any two sides must be greater than or equal to the length of the remaining side. This statement permits the inclusion of degenerate triangles, but some authors, especially those writing about elementary geometry, will exclude this possibility, thus leaving out the possibility of equality. If x, y, and z are the lengths of the sides of the triangle, with no side being greater than z, then the triangle inequality states that :z \leq x + y , with equality only in the degenerate case of a triangle with zero area. In Euclidean geometry and some other geometries, the triangle inequality is a theorem about distances, and it is written using vectors and vector lengths (norms): :|\mathbf x + \mathbf y| \leq |\mathbf x| + |\mathbf y| , where the length z of the third side has been replaced by the vector sum x + y. When x and y are real numbers, they can be viewed as v
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