Concept

Electron–positron annihilation

Summary
Electron–positron annihilation occurs when an electron (Electron) and a positron (Positron, the electron's antiparticle) collide. At low energies, the result of the collision is the annihilation of the electron and positron, and the creation of energetic photons: :Electron + Positron → Photon + Photon At high energies, other particles, such as B mesons or the W and Z bosons, can be created. All processes must satisfy a number of conservation laws, including: *Conservation of electric charge. The net charge before and after is zero. *Conservation of linear momentum and total energy. This forbids the creation of a single photon. However, in quantum field theory this process is allowed; see examples of annihilation. *Conservation of angular momentum. *Conservation of total (i.e. net) lepton number, which is the number of leptons (such as the electron) minus the number of antileptons (such as
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