Concept

Square root

Summary
In mathematics, a square root of a number x is a number y such that y^2 = x; in other words, a number y whose square (the result of multiplying the number by itself, or y \cdot y) is x. For example, 4 and −4 are square roots of 16 because 4^2 = (-4)^2 = 16. Every nonnegative real number x has a unique nonnegative square root, called the principal square root, which is denoted by \sqrt{x}, where the symbol "\sqrt{~^~}" is called the radical sign or radix. For example, to express the fact that the principal square root of 9 is 3, we write \sqrt{9} = 3. The term (or number) whose square root is being considered is known as the radicand. The radicand is the number or expression underneath the radical sign, in this case, 9. For non-negative x, the principal square root can also be written in exponent notation, as x^{1/2}
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